Stanley Park – Vancouver

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Sojourn

No trip twice the same

through Stanley Park’s winding paths.

New sights ev’ry day.

We have wandered these paths so many times, we have lost count. So, we chose a slightly different route today. There were highs and lows, but we also had some first time moments. Rather than go back to Prospect Point, we opted for Beaver Lake, not knowing at the time that the paths near it were very icy, but also partially closed, while some production group was shooting a podcast. We were in search of some good fish and chips before we flew back to landlocked Alberta. Rather than opt for Stanley’s at the Stanley Park Pavilion, we headed for the Tea House.

On arriving, we realized that not only had we never eaten there before, but, we had never before been on the paths to or at the Tea House. We were soon seated and our waiter appeared. We had our mouths all set on the Cod and chips selection, but, our server advised that their supplies had not yet arrived and that the fish and chips was not available today. Seeing our sad faces, he offered to try to have the chef prepare salmon and chips. While not our first choice, this would have to do. As he was about to head to the kitchen, word arrived that the cod was now on hand. Yay.

But, I am getting ahead of myself on the wander. Here are pix from the day.

English Bay activities

Birdlife on Lost Lagoon

Along Stanley Park’s trails

Up at the Teahouse

Walking back out of the park.

All in all, a great day for a wander.

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Prospect Point – Stanley Park, Vancouver

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Shirtsleeve Weather

Lion’s Gate traffic humming slowly from afar,

we stop at The Point to take stock of where we are.

Sun beaming down warmly on us, me in shirtsleeves,

spring not yet quite here, with trees awaiting their leaves.

North Vancouver was glistening on the North Shore,

Seaplanes and choppers fly overhead with a roar.

Restaurant closed, but concessions bar was still there

perched at the window with this memory to share.

Refreshments done, we did not want to leave this joint,

it was a day to remember at Prospect Point.

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Tatlow Trail – Stanley Park – Vancouver

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We’ve walked this trail many times before from Lost Lagoon to Prospect Point and back. The air was clear this day and while the trails were icy on places, we still enjoyed wandering through Stanley Park. The feature photo is from the Trailhead near Lost Lagoon.

From 3rd Beach

DSC00909DSC00910DSC00912DSC00913from Merilees TrailDSC00916DSC00917DSC00921back on Bridle Trail (or Bridal Trail, where the sign makers erred)DSC00934DSC00940

Tatlow Trail – Stanley Park – Vancouver

Featured

We’ve walked this trail many times before from Lost Lagoon to Prospect Point and back. The air was clear this day and while the trails were icy on places, we still enjoyed wandering through Stanley Park. The feature photo is from the Trailhead near Lost Lagoon.

From 3rd Beach

DSC00909DSC00910DSC00912DSC00913from Merilees TrailDSC00916DSC00917DSC00921back on Bridle Trail (or Bridal Trail, where the sign makers erred)DSC00934DSC00940

Vancouver – Stanley Park – One Foot in front of the Other

I think my Patty first coined this phrase, when people would ask us how we can walk so far. It is amazing how far you can walk and what you can see if you simply put…ONE… FOOT…IN…FRONT…OF…THE…OTHER. Now don’t get me wrong, we are not running a race or even trying to set any distance records. We just pick a direction or a path and start walking. Along the way, we see things new and old, sometimes in a new light, we walk and talk, we stop and listen, we sit and observe, we meet strangers on the same path who are simply friends we have not yet met.

Today was just such a day. We thought we were taking the same walk we took a week earlier, but it turns out, we were not. Oh, it was similar, but it was not the same. And that is what makes life so interesting and challenging. You start off on the same old path and you take one minor deviation and your whole world is changed (for the better or for the worse, hopefully, the better).

Here are the salient details:

Route (I have found that Google Maps has limitations. It does not always show all the permutations, particularly when they involve paths through parks. Also, they do not allow you to add enough destinations for a detailed route. These two maps are my best attempt at it. I am sure we walked farther and I am also sure the paths are not exactly as shown.

STANLEY 1STANLEY 2

Distance walked – 11 km (7 miles)

Elevation gain and loss – 43 m (141 feet)

Number of hikers we engaged in conversation for more than hi or good morning – 7

they included:

  • 2 ladies from the Hop on/Hop Off bus looking for a hollow log – not sure if they found it
  • another couple who had driven into the park asking us what they should see – they gasped when we told them how far we had already walked and this was at the halfway point in our hike
  • a fellow from near Melbourne, Australia with questions about beavers-hey we are Canadian, just ask us.
  • a couple from Yorkshire, England keenly interested in the birds, as we were. Yes, that was indeed a female Wood Duck

Sights we saw.

LOST LAGOON

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TATLOW TRAIL

 

THIRD BEACH

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MERILEES TRAIL

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PROSPECT POINT

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NO NAME PATH AND SEA WALL

RAVINE TRAIL

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BEAVER LAKE

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SOUTH CREEK TRAIL, ROSE GARDEN and back around LOST LAGOON

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We had a lupper on the way home and then recuperated for an hour or so, before getting the wanderlust again. You see, we “needed” gelato and set off for another 2 km return trip to Bella Gelateria. Yum. Did I mention that all this walking burns calories?

BELLA

Vancouver – Cycling the Stanley Park “See” Wall

Vancouver is very bicycle transit oriented. Our son has had a hand in this since coming to Vancouver in 2010. When we come, he always encourages us to get on bikes and pedal our asses all over town. We willfully comply, but lately given aging bodies and bad knees, it has become more of a challenge, especially when following his young knees away from a traffic light, or up hill or just about anywhere.

We did the tandem thing for a number of trips and found out that 2 old people on a tandem can almost keep up with one young person on a street bike. But, again, the knees complain and we want to travel so much further.

We rented E-bikes (ped-elec) from EzeeRiders once or twice and found the bikes offered to be less than stellar. There was a lag time between pedalling and power boost which could be quite unsettling and possibly dangerous. On this trip, we opted for Cycle City rentals on Hornby (right on the bike lane). They offer a 10% discount, if you book on-line at least 12 hours in advance. But, as we found out, it should actually read 10% discount is applicable if you book before Noon on the day prior to rental. We pointed out this ambiguity and they gave us our discount. Do take the optional insurance offered. These bikes are worth about $3,000 each and even in Canadian, that is a lot of money, if the bike is damaged or stolen. All bikes come with locks, helmets and water bottles. We brought our own helmets from home (kinda like bowling shoe phobia).

We also opted not to lock the bikes up during our travels, but to have one person stay with them while the other hunts and gathers. Both of us had bikes stolen in our younger years and we are just plain cautious, I guess.

On this leg of travel, we set off down Hornby towards Coal Harbour, taking a few jigs and jogs before arriving at the seawall bike path. Keep in mind, this starting point has a lot of tourists. Tourists take photos. Tourists walk in bike paths. Tourists go where you least expect them to go. I know this, because I am one.

We followed the sea wall path into Stanley Park and around the perimeter down English Bay, up onto the Cambie Bridge, down the Point Grey bike path to Jericho Beach, then back on the Seaside bike path to Cypress Street, to the Arbutus Greenway and stopped in the park near the best little French bakery coffee shop in Vancouver (Beaucoup) for Cinnamon scrolls and lattes, which we consumed in the park. Yum. Thus ends the 26.2 km. leg number one of our 51.5 km cycle day.

I will leave you with the “SEE” part of the trip showing what we observed as we would our way through novice and just plain dangerous cyclists. Take your time and it will be alright (Oh and never do the Stanley Park part on a sunny weekend day in summer. It is just too congested and you won’t have fun).

The city skyline from near Brockton Point

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Wildlife

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Vessels

The view from Jericho Beach

The E-bike tourists at Volunteer Park

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