Doin’ the Bunny Hop – Fur-Baby Sitting

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Our son and his wife were embarking on a short vacation and we were entrusted with their little ones’ (our fur Grand-Babies) care. They have 3 bunnies and a chinchilla. We were both honoured and nervous, likely both signs of good Grandparents. As they do not play nicely together, each one had to be let out separately for exercise, so there were no spats. All in all, we enjoyed the experience.

Doin’ the Bunny Hop

They walk through the door, like they own the place,

but when we see them, we don’t know their face.

With clumsy hands, they maneuver our homes,

not like we’re used to, but we’ve room to roam.

Hall doors are closed and soon all is secure,

After one more check, its time for our tour.

Impatient Eleanor, first to run free,

binking and hopping, just as it should be.

Next comes Carob, her cage such a real mess.

Could it be much worse? The answer is yes.

Amelia the mischievous goes last,

zipping by at top speed, she has a blast.

Cages cleaned, food and water just dandy,

At long last, it was time for poor Ande.

He slowly creeps about from side to side,

Despite the strangers, he takes it in stride.

Playtime done, we fur babies settle in,

these “hoomins” were nice, hope they come again.

…….and now, the stars of our little play…….

Eleanor

 

Carob

 

Amelia (the mischievous)

 

Ande

 

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Nature Comes Alive – Edmonton River Valley – mid April

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Thought I’d better catch up on my other posts between my series. This may be a bit out of season, but strangely enough, there were places in Alberta that had snow on the past weekend. This walk starts in Capilano Park.

Nature Comes Alive

Starting slowly at first,

then with a sudden burst,

long dead branches of grey,

new green buds now display,

their tang scenting the air,

curing winter despair,

that this day would arrive,

when nature comes alive.

 

 

 

 

 

Jasper National Park in April – Driving Home – Yellowhead-ing It

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Point of Disclosure–Highway 16 and the mountain pass it runs through are referred to as “The Yellowhead”, after an Iriquois-Metis trapper, fur-trader and explorer who worked for the Hudson’s Bay Company during the 18th and 19th centuries. His name was Pierre Hastination or Pierre Bostonais (Boston Man, a name given to him by First Nations members to indicate his American origin), but because of his yellow hair, his nickname was Tete Jaune (French for Yellow Head). In the early 19th Century Pierre and his men crossed the Rocky Mountains through the pass that would later bear his name. (Source:https://www.tetejaunelodge.com/history)

Yellowhead-ing It

This is the moment we have been dreading, yet,

as we leave Jasper town, Yellowhead-ing it,

we can’t help but feel our smiles spreading a bit.

Trip starting at Marmot, we were shredding it,

on to Icefields glacier, no one sledding it,

then off to waterfall, with ice spreading it

and around 5 Lakes all ice, but shedding it,

before hiking hill with snow paths threading it.

Seeing the view with mountains embedding it.

we knew in 3 weeks we’d return again yet.

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Jasper National Park in April – Maligne Canyon Magic

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The Maligne River and Maligne Canyon are an interesting formation. The Maligne River flows as a full size river for 15 km upstream of Medicine Lake. Medicine Lake empties and fills throughout the year and the amount of water in the lake is purely dependent on the season.

Shortly after exiting Medicine Lake, the Maligne River becomes a “losing stream”, flowing underground until reaching the canyon where many smaller streams rebuild the river. The river cuts through the slot canyon limestone bedrock, exposing the underground river at several points. The underground river amplifies the flow as the river continues to drop down the canyon.

The canyon height reaches a maximum of 50 m (160 feet) depth and at points is less than 2 m (6.6 feet) wide.

(Source:Wikipedia)

Magical Maligne

Constantly flowing,

appearing, disappearing.

Magical Maligne.

 

Here is what you see form the parking lot. note the red tinge caused by the Mountain Pine Beetle infestation in the wide angle shot. Yikes. It is everywhere.

 

Here are a couple of shots of the upper canyon near the Tea House. You can walk down the canyon to 6th bridge, but we did not have the time to spare on this day.

 

Jasper National Park in April – Pyramid Island – Pyramid Scheme

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Up near the end of Pyramid Lake Road, in Pyramid Lake with a fabulous view of Pyramid Mountain is a small island called Pyramid Island. Noticing a theme here yet?

You park in the small parking lot and walk across a wooden bridge and there you are, surrounded by mountain beauty.

Pyramid Scheme

As if in a dream

magical alpine island.

A Pyramid scheme.

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